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Insider Insight: Jyoti Sharma, founder and CEO of TaraCares

This week we meet Jyoti Sharma, founder and CEO of TaraCares

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Jyoti Sharma

Jyoti Sharma is the founder and CEO of TaraCares, a London and York based start-up addressing women’s unmet health needs in menopause awareness, diagnosis and management.

What is your morning routine?

I normally wake up between 5:30 and 6:00. Devices do not enter the bedroom so my phone screen is not the first thing that grabs my attention. I sit silently in bed for 15-20 minutes feeling the inner energy of the body followed by morning prayer. 

I start the day with either a 30-45 minute quiet time that can be silent sitting, or a walk in nature in beautiful York to tune into the chirping birds. I can see the sun rise from my study so depending on the time of year and if not travelling I like to see the sunrise. 

Between 8:30 and 9:00 I am prepared to meet the world. A quick glance at LinkedIn, and the inbox to respond to priority emails – timebound to 30-45 minutes since I use my morning time for creative thinking on all days. 

Which technology could you not live without?

Personally, I am increasingly becoming a minimalist. So honestly if I was not building a start-up, I’d have no problem staying without my phone.

Even now, I exercise quite some discipline in what email messages I respond to via phone and which ones are categorised for a ponder, pause, draft, review before I hit send. LinkedIn is probably an app that I am most dependent upon from a business perspective. 

How do you relax?

I am an outdoor person. I am happiest if I can kick a football around in vast green fields or engage in a sport such as tennis, badminton, or a nice swim in the sea. 

I love to wander and hike aimlessly. Listening to the rolling sea waves, watching the transforming hues of a clear sky and the melody of a robin stir my soul.

For me routine and discipline is an essential part of my professional life. In personal life everything has to be spontaneous following the energy of the moment. It is actually something I do in business as well if the situation lends itself to it.

Which quote resonates with you?

There are so many, but if I had to pick one then this one from Eckhart Tolle sums it up for me “What this world needs is not a change of circumstances but a change of consciousness.”

That’s why TaraCares was founded and how we go about our business pioneering research and science in action for all women irrespective of their socio-economic or health status or any limiting beliefs and pressures of the world.

What is the best thing about your job?

The research and science, the energy of the cosmos (people, plants, animals, every blade of grass) that cooperate to create the magic and the twinkle in the eyes of literally everyone we have spoken to or collaborated with thus far  when they hear about our mission and its swift execution.

What keeps you motivated?

The research on lived experience of menopause with women (Assigned female at birth)  and innovation in precision medicine. 

The incoming research responses from participants who are trusting us with sharing their intimate story of suffering because they see the promise of a healthier more equitable world for women inspires us to keep working harder in responsible ways and the innovations in precision medicine empower us to create the reality of our vision.

What advice would you give to your younger self?

That’s always an interesting question for me as I feel a “certain” response is expected of a start-up founder.

I have really harnessed every situation life has presented me so far. Patience is practised in moderation even now in alignment with the energies presenting themselves.

Perhaps my younger self could have been less impulsive but I don’t regret anything as it just accelerated my learning and growth curve and sharpened my natural intelligence to take risks which are now more calculated. 

What is the most important lesson you have learned on your start-up journey?

At the end of the day it is your business! It is extremely important to check-in regularly – I do it every weekend and sometimes evenings as well during the week – check in with yourself and the why behind the mission. That’s the orienting principle.

Linked to that as well, the advice I gave to my younger self is give people – future employees and investors – the time to prove their commitment and dedication to the mission and earn your trust.

That’s a delicate balance in a start-up but to pause in the midst of pace is my guiding principle. I am quite watchful to spot anything/anyone creating an imbalance which is restored swiftly.

What is something you wish you could experience again for the first time? 

So many of them! The first time I parasailed over the green emerald in Lake Tahoe was quite magical. It is lighter and quieter when you are so high in the sky. 

I use that feeling when work or simply living becomes busy and burdensome. 

Feeling heavy with the weight of things is a direct indicator of getting lost in human psychological consciousness. There is another way to approach life and that is to be in what is real, this moment right here, right now. 

What is your greatest achievement since establishing your company?

Winning the UKRI Innovate UK Fast Start grant award three months into my start-up journey in September 2022 was quite magical. That too in our first attempt when we were still in the concept phase. It has been a game changer for us to get phenomenal early results to propel us to the next stage.

For more info, visit taracares.co.uk.

Insider Insight

Insider Insight: Ruth Healey, president of Soroptimist International Great Britain and Ireland (SIGBI)

This week we meet Ruth Healey, president of the women’s charity Soroptimist International Great Britain and Ireland (SIGBI)

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Ruth Healey, president of Soroptimist International Great Britain and Ireland (SIGBI)
Ruth Healey is the president of the women’s charity, Soroptimist International Great Britain and Ireland (SIGBI). She is passionate about making positive change for women and girls and is incredibly proud of what the charity has achieved over the last 100 years.

 

What is your morning routine?

I’d like to say it’s a quick five-mile run with my dog – Blossom – followed by 20 minutes on the bike before I get to my desk, but in actuality it’s a little bit more sedate than that!

I wake up at 6.30am and the first thing I do is head downstairs for breakfast. This is usually a slice of toast, followed by quickly checking my emails, I always find time to walk Blossom (leisurely – she’s getting on), and then start work in earnest.

I find that getting some fresh air in the morning helps to set me up for the day – my head feels clearer and ready to get stuck into the day’s busy schedule.

Which technology could you not live without?

All of it! Sometimes I think it would be lovely not to be on call 24/7, but it’s so ingrained in our daily lives that I don’t think it’s possible to live without it.

I openly admit that I’m joined at the hip with my phone, so not having that would mess up my day, as I use it for almost everything.

How do you relax?

I find walking my dog very calming, but I’m also an avid jigsaw fan. It’s a great way to wind down and lose yourself in something that isn’t on a screen.

I also love meeting up with friends for lunch or days out. It’s important to spend time with the people who make you happy.

Which quote resonates with you?

It has to be one by Barack Obama about change. He says: “Change will not come if we wait for some other person or some other time. We are the ones we’ve been waiting for. We are the change that we seek.”

As the president of an international women’s charity that has consultancy status at the United Nations, positive change to advance the lives of women and girls is at the heart of everything we stand for.

We have 248 clubs throughout the UK, Malta, Asia and the Caribbean – over 200 of which are in the UK – and a total of 5,150 members globally. Every single one of us cares about achieving positive change for women and girls.

What is the best thing about your job?

Meeting up with our strong, inspiring members – travelling around the country, hearing their stories and understanding the daily challenges they face.

Members of SIGBI are known as ‘Soroptimists’ – a term that was coined from the Latin ‘soror’ meaning sister, and ‘optima’ meaning best. So, Soroptimist is perhaps best interpreted as ‘the best for women’.

The charity’s heritage stretches back more than a century, and all our members want to give something back to their communities, to make their voices heard on issues that affect women, and to support women and girls who are vulnerable, disadvantaged or do not have a voice

This is an incredibly rewarding role, and the people I get to work with are some of the most inspirational people I’ve ever had the pleasure of meeting.

What keeps you motivated?

Witnessing the huge amount of work being done by SIGBI members and the impact that it’s having on the lives of women and girls.

We all work together to tackle gender violence and inequality, creating a positive impact both locally and globally. It’s truly inspiring.

What is the most important lesson you have learned since you joined SIGBI?

I have learned to listen. Truly listen and don’t just wait for a gap in the conversation to make your point.

What advice would you give to your younger self?

Be more adventurous and don’t believe your imposter syndrome!

What is something you wish you could experience again for the first time?

Arriving in Bermuda on a 36-foot yacht having sailed 1,200 miles from Florida. I was the navigator, so I had a huge sense of achievement that we’d found this small island in the middle of the Atlantic!

What is your greatest achievement since joining SIGBI?

This is a tricky one. I don’t think I have a greatest achievement other than the honour of being elected to this role. However, as a team, there is so much to be proud of.

We are going through a process of modernisation at the moment, which is not easy. Change is challenging, or even frightening, for some, but I’m so proud of the way our members have engaged with the conversation.

And of course, alongside that is all the work being done. Working together this year we have supported over 85,000 women and girls and raised over £600,000 to support our projects. It’s a huge collective achievement and one we can all be proud of.

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Insider Insight: Margaret Zablocka, founder and CEO of Onoco

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Margaret Zablocka, founder and CEO of Onoco
We meet Margaret Zablocka, founder and CEO of Onoco – a parenting app inspired by Margaret’s own motherhood journey that combines baby trackers, routine planners and developmental milestones and empowers parents through science-based education.
What is your morning routine?

My mornings are pretty grounded in reality; they don’t start with sunrise workouts or meditation. The first thing I do, despite not being a morning person, is wake up my children. Without that, we’d all risk oversleeping.

I take my time getting them ready for school, ensuring they start their day with a nutritious breakfast. Once they’re off to school with my husband, I cherish a moment of solitude with my morning coffee and catch up on emails. This simple routine keeps me grounded and ready to tackle the day.

Which technology could you not live without?

Fast internet. It’s not about it being essential for survival, but our lives are so intertwined with being online that when I’m without it, the difference is palpable. It keeps me connected, informed and efficient.

How do you relax?

Relaxation for me is about the small moments: watering my houseplants with music in the background, snuggling with my family on the sofa, or escaping on a weekend trip with a friend. There’s a variety of ways, but they all bring me back to centre.

Which quote resonates with you?

George S. Patton’s quote, “A good plan violently executed now is better than a perfect plan executed next week,” really speaks to me. It’s a reminder not to get caught in endless planning. Action is often more valuable than waiting for perfection. Some of the best outcomes have come from decisions made swiftly and boldly.

What is the best thing about your job?

The magic of my job lies in its impact. Crafting a product that not only looks great but genuinely enriches lives is profoundly satisfying.

It’s when I receive feedback, not just praises, but stories of how our app has revolutionised parenting or caregiving for someone that I truly feel the weight of our work. It’s these moments of connection and transformation that stand out as the best parts of my job.

What keeps you motivated?

The user feedback is incredibly uplifting; knowing our app makes a real difference keeps me going. There is also the ever-evolving nature of the tech industry, with its relentless pace and constant innovation, drives me to not just keep up but to lead and innovate.

What is the most important lesson you have learned on your start-up journey?

Start building your network from day one. It might seem like just another task, but the power of networking is immense. It’s helped secure funding, increase product visibility and achieve things no marketing campaign could.

Even though, sometime it might feel like an additional job  – writing posts on LinkedIn and showing up to networking events etc. Never underestimate the value of strong professional relationships.

What advice would you give to your younger self?

It’s a difficult question because that could change how my life turned out. I would probably try to reassure myself that doing many things at once can be a good thing.

Early on, I was always busy, joining organisations and working on various projects. And, although it might seem minor, I’d stress the importance of sticking with German lessons. My skills are embarrassingly basic despite years of classes.

What is something you wish you could experience again for the first time?

Witnessing the “firsts” of my children—those unparalleled moments of their first smile, step, or word—brought a joy that’s hard to describe. If I could, I’d relive those moments in a heartbeat. There’s a unique wonder and happiness in those first-time experiences that’s just pure magic, a reminder of the beauty and simplicity of life’s milestones.

What is your greatest achievement since establishing Onoco?

Onoco being named App of the Day is a highlight of my professional journey. Considering the Apple App Store sees nearly 1,000 new app submissions daily and boasts close to two million apps in total, being recognised by Apple’s editors is no small feat.

Their endorsement, stating “Babies don’t come with a manual, but Onoco is the next best thing,” is not just an honour but a testament to our team’s hard work and dedication. It’s one of the most validating moments in my career.

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Insider Insight: Somer Baburek, co-founder and CEO of Hera Biotech

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Somer Baburek, co-founder and CEO of Hera Biotech
This week we meet Somer Baburek, co-founder and CEO of the women’s health start-up Hera Biotech. Based in San Antonio, Texas, Somer is on a mission to develop and commercialise the world’s first non-surgical test for definitive diagnosis and staging of endometriosis.

 

What is your morning routine? 

My current morning routine is not what I would consider my “normal” routine as I have an infant who now somewhat dictates when my morning begins. That said, I am usually up between 4-5am and a cup of coffee is my first priority (after feeding the baby, of course).

If the little one sleeps later, I usually try to catch a little bit of national news and respond to emails that came in overnight while I sip coffee. If she’s up, I have the news on in the background while I play with her.

At 6am, I wake up my other two daughters and get them ready for school. We try to always do morning drop off as a family and then we’re back home to start the day. Childcare arrives at 8:30am and then I begin my “official” workday.

Which technology could you not live without? 

Unfortunately, I must say my cell phone. It allows me to work from anywhere, which affords me the luxury of attending school events, having lunch with my kiddos, or answering emails/taking calls in the pickup line or at one of the many sports practices. I feel very fortunate to be able to be involved with my children and not bound to an office or computer for work.

How do you relax?

Admittedly, I am not great about this. I am notorious for sitting down only to immediately think of something I “need” to do before I relax. I try to find little moments for mental calm. Often this is when I’m putting the baby down to sleep or going for a run, these quiet little moments allow me to intentionally clear my mind, be present and let my mind relax.

To be fair, I also relish a glass of wine on the couch with my husband when all the littles are asleep, those conversations are some of my favourite and work wonders for decompressing.

Which quote resonates with you? 

My favourite quote is by the French poet, Ovid. The quote is, “Fortune and love, favour the brave.” Sometimes I have insecurities about my role as a CEO, wife, or mother, when I do, this quote seems to bring me comfort.

I feel like each of these roles requires me to be brave in different ways, this quote makes me realise that being brave enough to expand past my comfort zone in each of these roles is what will allow me to be, what I define, as successful in each of them.

What is the best thing about your job? 

The people! Endometriosis patients, my sister and niece included, are some of the strongest, fiercest, and intentionally vulnerable people I have ever had the pleasure of working for, I love them!

My colleagues at Hera are also some of my favourite people. I love how dedicated everyone is to improving the diagnostic process for the patients and being thoughtful about each and every stakeholder in the process.

I also routinely marvel and the diversity on our team; everything from education to professional, to cultural. It would be an understatement to say that we all come from VERY different backgrounds but somehow it blends beautifully.

What keeps you motivated?

There are two things that keep me extremely motivated. The first is patients; hearing the stories of what they’ve gone through to get a diagnosis never cease to motivate me. I love hearing from them and knowing that the work we are doing has the potential to completely shift the paradigm of care and the process of diagnosis is what pushes me through some of the tough spots.

The other thing that motivates me is my children. I have three daughters, who will all be subjected to the standards of care in women’s health at some point in the relatively near future. I do not want them to experience the same standards, societal/medical gaslighting, and/or societal/cultural reluctance to openly talk about women’s health that I experienced.

The idea that I may be able to improve their experience, or at least equip them with knowledge of the gaps and enable them to advocate for themselves is highly motivating.

What is the most important lesson you have learned on your start-up journey?

People are full of advice and opinions about every aspect of your business. There is something to be learned from everyone, but without data, advice and opinions should be taken at face value.

Additionally, there are people in the investor world who just feel the need to treat founders terribly. In my experience, the people who try the hardest to make you feel like you don’t know what you’re talking about, are often the ones with the least relevant knowledge in your field!

What advice would you give to your younger self?

Lighten up! You don’t have to have all the answers.

What is something you wish you could experience again for the first time?

Getting my first check from an investor that I hadn’t known for years. It was such a euphoric feeling of accomplishment. I felt like I had done a good job at explaining not only our business model and strategy, which is my background, but also the science behind the test. I felt so proud that I was able to represent the work of my co-founders well enough to garner investment, it was really lovely.

What is your greatest achievement since establishing Hera Biotech?

In my mind there are two highlights here, one personal and one professional. Professionally, I think our biggest accomplishment has been taking the test into the clinic. This is a real turning point, seeing your product being used by real people on real people; truly moving.

Personally, I think the highlight has been bringing conversations about women’s health, female founders and investing into the forefront of our family conversations.

As an example, my oldest daughter recently had a very serious conversation with me and my husband about wanting to use the money she had saved up to invest in a business. We talked about due diligence, equity, and the difference between investing and giving.

Those were not conversations that I heard or had at 11 and I love that these concepts are things she is already comfortable talking and asking questions about. 

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